New Music

Listen: phile. – Middle Head

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Gareth Psaltis’s Voriulk EP was one of my favourite dance releases of last year, so it’s interesting to hear him bounce ideas off a collaborator in this newish sideproject. phile. is Psaltis with Hannah Lockwood, and together they create muted techno with a slightly brighter approach compared to Psaltis’s solo material. It’s still pretty dour, but you know, Voriulk is one of the most oppressive records I’ve heard in a very long time.

It’s worth rifling through the phile. Soundcloud account for two other extended live sets, with the beatless Outer Space track a beatless highlight.

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New Music

Listen: Gareth Psaltis – Arbantu

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Sydney techno producer Gareth Psaltis has a debut 12 inch coming through Hunter Gatherer Records, and this is the first track you’ll get to hear from it. Entitled Voriulk, the EP runs for nearly 40 minutes and is due out August 19, so that’s enough time to get your head cleared because this record — and particularly the track below, ‘Arbantu’ — is pretty bleak.

‘Arbantu’ is shorter and probably a little more ornate than most of the other tracks on the record, but it’s fairly representative of the mood: Psaltis has a knack for bringing two competing rhythms or textures gradually closer together, and the effect when they eventually collide is what gives his work its disorienting, out-of-time sadness. Listen at the 50 second mark: towers gradually, beautifully collapsing, all lined up on a conveyor belt powered for aeons.

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New Music

Listen: Gareth Psaltis – Flux

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When he’s not organising shows in forests with Sydney techno promoters Anomaly, Gareth Psaltis is making strange, forest borne techno like ‘Flux’, which is his contribution to The Freeform Collective. He has a fair bit of material up his sleeve, but ‘Flux’ is pretty representative of where he’s at: if fellow Sydney techno producers Gardland trade in empty, emotionally autonomous greyscapes, then Psaltis’s productions tend to be a bit more crowded.

‘Flux’ evokes images of a techno-Lovecraftian system-as-beast, all cindered wires and purposeless metal creations. It sounds like the ambiance of a continent-spanning industrial dump, a jungle of broken consumer products, dumped server cabinets and a canopy of red, white and yellow cables.

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