New Music

Listen: Wonderfuls – Freezing Cold

Wonderfuls is a Brisbane duo consisting Bobby Bot (or Robert Vagg) and Danny McGirr. According to their bio, Wonderfuls was formed “shortly after Bobby was released from a relapse stint at the local psych ward [during] 2003-2004”. They released a 7 inch on Negative Guest List Records last year, and have just issued a live recording through Breakdance the Dawn, which we’ll review shortly. Bobby Bot also plays in Kitchen’s Floor, if you need a little bit of context.

The topic at hand is Wonderfuls’ Salty Town EP though, which is breathtakingly sad downer pop: bereft and hopeless, and glazed with a kinda dreamy autumnal patina. It’s just beautiful, frankly, but in a discomforting and broken way. I’m kinda stunned. The Negative Guest List 7 inch is great, but this is entirely different.

Some of the material on the new Breakdance the Dawn CD-R sounds like Jandek tuned to EADGBE, but this Salty Town is comparatively orthodox: chiming guitar melodies, tonnes of reverb and chorus, and a mood stuck somewhere between Death in June and Galaxie 500. It’s being issued on vinyl in December with five previously unreleased tracks. We’ll live Tweet the news as it comes to hand. Listen to all five tracks on the Wonderfuls Bandcamp.

Standard
News

Watch: Brisbane 2012 Documentary

Remember that documentary we mentioned a couple of weeks back about Brisbane’s weird music scene? Well now you can watch it in its entirety. Unlike the cut that was screened at Sound Summit, this version includes an interview with Per Purpose guy Glen Shenau. It’s essential viewing if you’ve got even the vaguest interest in Australian music.

Also featured in the documentary are interviews with Joel Stern (Disembraining Machine, Sky Needle), Scraps, Kitchen’s Floor, Matt Earle (Breakdance the Dawn, xNOBBQx) and Blank Realm. It is directed by Josh Watson.

Standard
New Music

Listen: Cured Pink – September Over September

Here’s a new Cured Pink track, probably the first officially available (to stream, anyway) offering from the group since that Breakdance the Dawn CD-R we reviewed a couple of weeks back. This track follows in a similar vein sonically, but we got in touch with Andrew McLellan to see exactly what was going on, because journalism.

“That was recorded in our shared bandspace on Saturday afternoon – just at the back of Mitchell’s and my house. We were just nutting out our set ahead of the Lost Domain finale out at Real Bad [the venue]. Which was awesome. Completely important band. Glen and I would hardly have a clue without them.

“I try to record as much as possible, to remember golden moments of improvisation [and to] generate material to overlay with other jams or experiments. You know most of the early 2012 results from the Breakdance CD-R.”

Cured Pink have a new 7 inch coming out later this year which will implement “these ideas in a professional studio”.

Standard
Reviews

Club Sound Witches – Club Sound Witches (CD-R)

If the text-based computer games you played as a kid suddenly turned blood red and instructed you to kill your parents (with an axe, ideally), the accompanying music would sound like Club Sound Witches. Consisting Matt Earle of various Breakdance the Dawn affiliates (X Wave and Girls Girls Girls among them) and one Nicola Morton, this is the sound of old hardware rising from its obsolete dormancy to suck your stupid brain dry.

As legend has it, the synths used on this record survived a thorough washing during the 2010-11 Queensland floods. I’m not sure what specific effect this had on the instruments, but the results here definitely sound broken or breaking. Unfathomably deep bass tones calmly ooze battery acid while distant echoed murmurs roleplay the monochrome soul of the machine. Each drawn out note modulates rhythmically beneath a surface of hiss, thus creating a kind of sub-sub-basement techno for people who can only dance while on horse tranquilizer, lying down.

In some ways Club Sound Witches is reminiscent of some of Basic Channel’s more stubbornly ugly material in its relentless non-humanness. But here, technology isn’t so much the threat as it is the last thing standing. This is the sound of everything – whether powered or breathing – grinding to a halt.

Please note the CD-R edition reviewed here featured two fifteen-minute long tracks, which are tracks 3 and 4 in the playlist below.

Label: Breakdance the Dawn
Release date: June 2012

Standard
Reviews

Cured Pink – Cured Pink 2012 (CD-R)

This CD-R was released through Breakdance the Dawn, so don’t expect much in the way of solid facts regarding this missive. Here’s what I’ve got though: on this album the Brisbane group consists of Andrew McLlellan, Glen Schenau and Mitchell Perkins, though Cured Pink is very much McLlellan’s beast. Schenau and Perkins recently got busted trespassing in some condemned Brisbane building, ostensibly on “Cured Pink duties”, so we’re dealing with probably the only QLD noise band to ever get a write up in the Courier Mail.

There are seven tracks here, and all are the sonic equivalent of a violently rubbed scab. Red and black, with bits of yellow. It shares very little in common with the also self-titled Sabbatical cassette from a couple of years ago, this being wilfully lo-fi and very looosely delivered rock, versus that release’s more industrial leanings. The record at hand plods in a suggestively violent manner, like some glassed and livid sociopath, with echoed vocals delivered like threats from the other side of some nightmarish parking lot or RSL.

Take ‘Track 3’ for instance (there are no song titles), which maintains a fairly steady tempo but is delivered in such a militantly uptight manner that it sounds more like a machine efficiently chugging than a band playing. On the other hand, ‘Track 6’ is a lagging, almost blue-sy lurch through a glass and blood strewn hut somewhere in the sticks, offering absolutely nothing in the way of exuberance or joy, but sounding at least remotely human.

Minor points of difference aside, Cured Pink is marked mainly by tension. There’s an almost overbearing sense of downtrodden masculinity about it: welling up, heavy veined, locked grimaces. It sounds constantly on the brink of being properly fucked. You can’t really ask for much more than that.

Label: Breakdance the Dawn
Release date: July 2012

Standard