New Music

Listen: Blank Realm – Cleaning Up My Mess

Blank Realm’s new record is coming soon. Initially scheduled for an October release, it’s been pushed back to November, so there’s probably a tonne of Diehard Fans scraping the nether-regions of the internet for answers. We have answers to nothing, but we do have a song from Go Easy – the forthcoming album through Bedroom Suck and Siltbreeze – that you probably haven’t heard before. It’s called ‘Cleaning Up My Mess’, and it’s yet another minor departure for a band that revels in never doing the same thing twice. If you’ve been following them since the ye olde Music Your Mind Will Love You days, you’ll know what I mean.

Most will take it for granted, but be forewarned/fore-tantalised that this track isn’t totally representative of what Go Easy will deliver. The Brisbane group like to take you on a journey. Just drink it in. If you want to buy the mp3s instead of wait for Physical Product, do it here.

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News

Watch: Brisbane 2012 Documentary

Remember that documentary we mentioned a couple of weeks back about Brisbane’s weird music scene? Well now you can watch it in its entirety. Unlike the cut that was screened at Sound Summit, this version includes an interview with Per Purpose guy Glen Shenau. It’s essential viewing if you’ve got even the vaguest interest in Australian music.

Also featured in the documentary are interviews with Joel Stern (Disembraining Machine, Sky Needle), Scraps, Kitchen’s Floor, Matt Earle (Breakdance the Dawn, xNOBBQx) and Blank Realm. It is directed by Josh Watson.

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New Music

Listen: Blank Realm – Growing Inside

‘Growing Inside’ is taken from Blank Realm’s forthcoming Siltbreeze LP, which is due late in October. This song has been kicking around for several years, but it sounds a lot darker on record than I remember it live: now it’s a foggy, chorus-laden drift, and a lot of the furious energy I remember from their show at Sound Summit a couple of years ago is tempered by the funereal pace of the main riff.

The lyrics are fairly unambiguous: Daniel Spencer seems to be tracing a familiar coming-of-age narrative, but the accompaniment indicates it’s not an optimistic tale, with drudgery and paranoia blocking the light at the end of the proverbial tunnel. “Everybody’s living just to see how they die.” Whatever is growing inside appears to feed on endorphins. Miserablists take note.

After a little bit of digging (ie, a five second Google search) it turns out an Angela Bermuda directed clip for this track has been floating around the internet for… almost a year now!

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